Monday, April 13, 2009

Moments

Magnolia Blossoms


Last week’s snow fell, fortunately, lightly, to spring spiders’ draped cords, hanging.
A lively, green backdrop to crystals--so strange.
As if, at once, both winter and spring shared one space. For a moment.


In the shallow edge of Little Pond pool, where blossoms have turned to keys on bare branches, last year’s fallen leaves fade--red to black, in clear water.
Until the new and green rounds out their forms, they are both here, and not.

Maple Keys above

Fallen Leaves in Water
Red Maple, Acer rubrum

While in the woods, quietly resting, in the oak leaf-lined basin of Wood pool, dark tannin-stained water hides the masses of eggs. Soon larval salamanders will feed here, this pool overflowing with mosquitoes wriggling, tail upward at the surface.

Spotted Salamander egg masses
(look like potatoes on bottom of pool)

Mosquito larvae at surface
(click to enlarge)


This intricate puzzle of days,
layer upon layer,
fingers laced so perfectly, together,
lays moment upon moment.

Keys of Red Maple, Acer rubrum

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27 comments:

Deborah Godin said...

Your blog is one I always anticipate visiting for the beauty and poetry of your images and words, but this one post to linger over, each part is a complete wonder, and your own reverence for these moments shines through. (hope that was winter, waving the white flag to spring - I give up!)

The-Grizzled-But-Still-Incorrigible-Scribe-Himself! said...

Nina…that shot of the snowflakes on the spiderweb is simply extraordinary! In all my years, I've never seen either the real thing or a photo—though surely there have been times afield when simply not paying close enough attention allowed me to miss this unique sight.

Thank you!

Appalachian Lady said...

The maple leaves in the water is an absolutely stunning photo. I need to get out and look at nature more but unfortunately I don't have the same eyes as you.

dguzman said...

sigh...:)

Cindie U. said...

Nina, if you aren't a poet, you should be. I'd buy your book filled with nature photography and prose.

Barb said...

The icy spider web was just beautiful - reminded me of intricate lace hung out on a washline to dry.

Anna said...

A lovely post. Thank you !

gardenpath said...

Wow, so beautiful. Just the kind of moments that stay with me.

Lisa at Greenbow said...

I will be looking for "potatos" in any water I see now. I wish I could see the salamanders etc. I just don't know where to go.

Sylvia K said...

Lovely post and lovely photos! Thanks for sharing both!

Ginnymo said...

I love reading your blogs Nina. You tell the story of each photo so deeply. Thanks.

Life with Kaishon said...

I love your pictures this week. They spoke to my soul! So beautiful! What a blessing!

Rinkly Rimes said...

Those threatening mosquitoes remind me of our summer ..... and a part of it that I'm glad has gone!

Heather said...

"This intricate puzzle of days,
layer upon layer,
fingers laced so perfectly, together,
lays moment upon moment."... Oh wow, Nina... THAT is beautiful!

Deborah Godin said...

Just stopping by again for another look at your post. Love those ghostly leaves, and my mysterious pools. The images stayed with me all day!

NCmountainwoman said...

Another wonderful post, Nina. Lovely photographs and poetic narrative. All of it is beautiful and fills me with hope.

Arija said...

Your post is sheer poetry with wonderful pictures of the minutiae of life. Thank you.

Tumblewords: said...

Perfect photos and poetic pennings. A joy to read and absorb!

Kelly said...

...interesting. I didn't know that's what salamander masses looked like. Now I'll be sure to check for potatoes in shallow ponds.

Sky said...

beautiful images and poetry.

leejatta said...

A real post for this day - wonderful photos and words, thank you!

nina at Nature Remains. said...

Kelly--those egg masses are almost ready to hatch. When they're "fresh," the gelatin is clean and clear, embryos easily seen within. After the weeks' time, algal growth in and around the masses hides them--and heavy as they are, they can be difficult to spot on the bottom of a vernal pool. Look near submerged sticks--you can see that they lay their eggs in masses attached to underwater stems, so they don't float away in heavy rains.
The salamanders have already left these waters to return to their underground lives in the adjacent woodlots. (mole salamanders live in underground tunnels and are rarely seen except in the spring, when they migrate to vernal pools to breed and leave eggs)
More photos may be seen here:

Kenton and Rebecca said...

You wrote:

"Last week’s snow fell, fortunately, lightly, to spring spiders’ draped cords, hanging.
A lively, green backdrop to crystals--so strange.
As if, at once, both winter and spring shared one space. For a moment."

Like a perfect haiku, you invoked so much feeling -- we felt encompassed in the moment. Thank you.

Babooshka said...

Perfect moments captured. Nature does it best.

Bernie said...

Nina, you have been given a beautiful gift of words and photography......perhaps it's time to take a leap of faith and publish a book....just saying Nina as your post brings goosbumps of gratitude each time I visit.
God Blesss:) Bernie

Dragonstar said...

I love the delicacy of so many of your photos - but I admit to feeling the world would be a better place without mosquitoes!

Jay said...

That first picture is stunning! I've got so used to my little point and shoot for convenience that I forget how much you can add to a picture by choosing depth of field.