Thursday, April 16, 2009

Caption Contest

Tree Swallow male, Tachycineta bicolor

Tree Swallow female

The Tree Swallows have returned.
This year, it appears they've chosen the box where the Chickadees lived last year, instead of their regular box, closer to the woods.
Or perhaps they're still discussing it...anyone speak Swallow?



(click to enlarge!)

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25 comments:

Kiggavik said...

"He's like this every time Idol is on."

Greg said...

"What do you MEAN you don't KNOW what box you packed it in?!?"

Desert Survivor said...

"I told you we should have asked for directions!"

cestoady said...

WHAT !!! --- you FORGOT your toothbrush !!

nina at Nature Remains. said...

I hope you're enlarging the last photo--the expressions on the faces is tooo much!

Susan Gets Native said...

The one getting yelled at looks like he is saying,
"La la la la la....I'm not listeninnnnnnnng!"
I tell ya, Nina. Our houses have some sort of bird/bug connection. Our TRES showed up today checking out our gourds!

TSannie said...

"Maybe if I close my eyes, the yammering will stop."

TSannie said...

"Maybe if I close my eyes, the yammering will stop."

Elisabeth's bright side said...

Just wonderful! You pictured them so well. Hope they are not throwen out in the end. What happen to their old box, and do they not make their own nests? You see, I don't know tree swallows, but I think it's interesting anyway. Thank you for sharing!

nina at Nature Remains. said...

Elisabeth--Tree Swallows are categorized as "cavity nesters," meaning they use a hole, usually within a dead tree, as the space within which to construct their nest. They will collect grasses and feathers from the surrounding area and form a nice, soft area within this box to raise their brood.
Some birds, like woodpeckers, excavate their own holes, and build within them. Others, like tree Swallows and Bluebirds, use the holes left by others.

Nest boxes are a way to provide nesting sites in areas where, either through habitat loss (homeowners often cut down dead trees) or competition (European Starlings and House Sparrows are invasive here) native birds may struggle to successfully raise young each spring.

These birds are migratory, going south for the winter, and returning here when it warms in the spring to breed.

Richard said...

Same picture...2 quotes.

"I fly all this way and all you can find is a 'Fixer-Er-Upper'"

"And while you are at it, I want a new bed and don't forget to paint the walls blue"

giggles said...

"I'm not cleaning this house....again!"

Marty52 said...

"You have GOT to be kidding! I TOLD you I wanted a new nest box, this is NOT A NEW NEST BOX!!!Mother said you would always pretend you couldn't hear me and I see she was right!! DON'T you turn away from me you.. you.. you swallow you!"

Ginnymo said...

What awesome photos Nina!! Ha! The one does seem to be yelling at the other one.

Deborah Godin said...

Who knew swallows could be hen-pecked...

Mary said...

These are all great but I like Susan's: la la la la la I'm not listening to you.....

:o)

Mary said...

That last pic is SO PRICELESS!

Endment said...

Still laughing
don't have a caption but sure saw some good ones

Lisa at Greenbow said...

Nina, this photo is priceless. Of course she is saying "I told you I wanted vinyl siding not wood."

KatDoc said...

Mrs. Swallow (right): "And another thing ..."

Mr. Swallow (left): (thinking) "All things considered, I'd rather be in Philadelphia." ~Kathi

fudgelady said...

"Pay him no mind, he thinks he's Susan Boyle."

Old Wom Tigley said...

"I tawt I taw a puddy tat"

Excellent picture Nina

Julie Zickefoose said...

The neighbors must think my name is WHEREINTHEHAYULLYOUBEEN?

Kathiesbirds said...

I love tree swallows! They look so clean and fresh!

As for a caption:

"Herbert! I told you to check out the neighborhood before we moved in!"

Heather said...

Sorry Nina, I don't have a caption, but that last photo is priceless. Assuming the female is the one doing the yelling, the male is just taking whatever she's dishin' out - taking the "in one ear, out the other" approach. I think they're going to need to get along better than that if they expect to raise a successful brood!